How to get EPSDT funding, and keep it, for the behavioral treatment of a child

Here is a two-page paper describing the process of obtaining Medicaid funding of Behavioral Health Rehabilitation Services (BHRS) in the United States and how to keep it.  The Office for Civil Rights can be accessed when insurance companies, service providers, or State and County authorities interfere with access to treatment funding under the EPSDT mandate of the Medicaid Act, but first to you have to get it.

This paper describes how to get EPSDT funding for BHRS treatment.  The model described in this paper can be implemented anywhere in the United States.  It can also be implemented anywhere in the world under a variety of funding options.

This paper explains how parents can gain access to “The Greatest Treatment Funding Secret Ever Concealed” in the United States and keep the funding flowing from the day their child is born until their child reaches the age of 21, or until the child’s treatment program is finished successfully, whichever occurs sooner.  StepsToSecureEPSDTfundingForEffectiveTreatmentInAWraparoundCupForChildren.pdf

Please feel free to share this with others who may benefit from it.  Best wishes always.

Steve

Latest presentation on EPSDT funding as a Civil Right

I was invited again to AutismOne (the fifth year in a row) to present information about EPSDT funding and to talk about Defending the Civil Rights of Children with Disabilities.  In the link below, you can learn the latest information about these subjects, including the Supreme Court decision last month to deny providers of service the ability to challenge the State Medicaid Agency over low payment rates or other issues.

Learn about the benefits of enrolling your child in Medicaid to get support from the Office for Civil Rights when insurance companies, State governments or County governments try to cut your child’s treatment short before it’s finished successfully.  Click here to watch the video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nnv_68KIBFA

Best wishes always.

Steve Kossor